Walk The Line

It is always hard to say good-bye, but finally we left Lima for good and followed the Pan-American Highway further south. We visited the so-called Nazca Lines near Nazca.

After changing motor oil (fully synthetic 15W-50) and gear fluid (fully synthetic 75W-90) as well as adjusting the valves, we took off in order to travel on across South America.

Our new friend and VW Bug enthusiast, Miguel Angel, escorted us out of the city.

Cops are often not as nice as this one here (see below). Corruption is a common habit.

After leaving Lima, we spent our first night in Ica. We didn’t take a shower for once.

We are both adventurers, but we’re trying to avoid such showers in Latin America.

415 Volt and a lot of water are probably no good combination while getting wet.

Such “boiler showers” are pretty in vogue here in South America.

In the morning we left Ica and got to the ancient geoglyphs of Nazca.

Better known as the Lines of Nazca – a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1994.

The Nazca Lines were created by the Nazca culture between 400 and 650 AD.

Maria Reiche, a German archaeologist studied the Lines of Nazca for decades.

During her field studies she was driving a Volkswagen T1 and a split-window Bug.

The Nazca Desert was Maria Reiche’s life. She spent almost every moment outside.

Maria Reiche also sponsored the tower these pictures were taken from.

In her later years, Maria Reiche had to use a wheelchair and she also lost her sight.

She died of ovarian cancer in 1998 and was buried near Nazca.

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9 thoughts on “Walk The Line

  1. Dear couple:
    Just to inform you, cops in Peru are the worst (avoid crossing Juliaca-PE, there is a way to go around the city (find the way in the GPS)… there the corruption flies in the air… cops stop you every corner of the city)… In Bolivia they are not nice either, but not as bad as in Peru…
    Diferently, Chile has the most reliable police of South America, maybe of the world…
    About “boiler showers”… that is the only way we can have hot showers in South America. They are completely safe… Better trust me, otherwise you won’t take a warm shower for weeks…
    We are waiting for you, with a nice “boiler shower” here in SP, Brasil.
    Regards, Paula & Paulo.

  2. There is just so much to see in this world. We are still following you and getting Stewball ready for our NY to Alaska rally. Back from sailing for awhile. that is on hold until next winter.
    J&E

  3. I come here everyday to see news of your trip. Congratulations for the initiative and the bravery! 😉
    About the showers… Its completely safe! I don’t really know why they use the power switch beside the shower (its not commom) and left the power lines exposed, but the chance you have an electric shock is minimal. Those showers use to be powered by 127 or 220 volts maximum, not 415v. Relax and have a nice warm shower in the end of the day! 😉

    Hugs from Jaú-SP, Brazil! 😉

    • Hello Antonio Carlos!
      I had written the same about the showers… completely safe…I live in Pirassununga and my family lives in Bauru. We are neighbors… rsrsrs!
      Best regards, Paula & Paulo.

      • Oh, we really are! I have two uncles in Bauru too. What a small world! 😀
        I’ve been in Pirassununga almost every year since 2005, in AFA’s Domingo Aéreo. Maybe we already bumped yourself over there in a line for a “espetinho”… hehehheheheheh…
        Add me on MSN. Maybe we arrange a meet next time! 😉

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